Foundations

Okay, so a bit of personal history to set the stage. An obstinate child, I refused to learn how to read. Why? Lord knows. It was my will against my schoolteacher’s, and I won. Then came round two when the school referred the matter to my parents. My mulishness is a family trait. (The day of my sister’s wedding, my brother-in-law, with horrid realization dawning upon him, took me aside and said, “Your sister’s very stubborn,” an understatement.) It would require and iron will to bend mine, and so, my father took it in hand to teach me to read; that is, every night I started my reading lessons under the compulsion of one or more spankings, and after starting me on a lesson, my father often found it necessary to further encourage me along at intervals to see it through to the end.

Anyway, that’s how I first learned English. Once my lessons were done, I never picked up a book of my own volition, that is, until I discovered a genre called science fiction. I “love” science fiction, but perhaps loved is a better term. As I grew older, science fiction stayed the same, which is to say, science fiction became more and more childish to my tastes. I wanted to love and enjoy science fiction, but couldn’t find material which moved and interested me as more mature writing could.

Yet despite my inability to find good science fiction, it is out there, and I have been pleased to discover one so far reliable source for science fiction endorsements, Extra Sci Fi, a YouTube show dedicated to presenting a bibliological history of science fiction. I have already talked about one of the stories on their list, Childhood’s End [Vision’s End, The Devil], and have recently begun reading a rather promising, if short, story, The House on the Borderland. I highly suggest the show, and would give Childhood’s End two thumbs up.

I wouldn’t have been able to read without my father, but I wouldn’t have learned to read without the wonderful taste of science fiction. So, today I take a moment to remember my original literary love, science fiction.

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4 Comments

  1. I love sci-fi, too. My fave genres are just.. whatever has some form of magic or otherworldly thing about it. Like fantasy, and it doesn’t always have to be high fantasy. Urban fantasy! And just really any speculative fiction 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I’ll give the old goat who taut/taught you to read one thumbs up for the gumption to take on such an impossible project–assuming we’re not all being pranked by one more work of fiction–but a thumb sideways for giving you about half or maybe only a third of what it sounds like you needed! (Or maybe it wasn’t his fault; maybe willow was not so plentiful where you grew up?)

    Like

  3. My oldest son sounds a lot like you, with the iron will😥😥, it takes so much out of us and he’s only 3😣. Kudos, to your dad for not giving up on you!

    I’m not a sci-fi reader per se, more of seeing it on screen. But I did start Octavia Butler’s Xenogenesis saga (first Black woman sci-fi writer😁😁) but that was over a year ago. Her world building is super detailed, but exceptional.

    Liked by 1 person

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